Uzbekistan: Karimov Decree Makes Schools, Universities Cell-Free Zones (Repost from Eurasia.net)

(c) Evgeny Kuzmin, Eurasia.Net, http://www.eurasianet.org/node/65545 Uzbekistan: Karimov Decree Makes Schools, Universities Cell-Free Zones President Islam Karimov's administration in Uzbekistan wants school-age children to be in school and studying. Yet a new rule imposed on schools and universities indicates that officials are worried Uzbek youngsters are learning too much. Under a decree adopted in late May, students …

Continue reading Uzbekistan: Karimov Decree Makes Schools, Universities Cell-Free Zones (Repost from Eurasia.net)

Post-Soviet education, part 2: Uzbekistan

Here are a couple of stories about cotton-rich Uzbekistan. The first, from a blog called Why Nations Fail, looks at the phenomenon of children being forced to pick cotton when they should be in school. Below is an extract from the blog post specific to Uzbekistan: ... For starters, take Uzbekistan. Why does it have …

Continue reading Post-Soviet education, part 2: Uzbekistan

Education and human rights in Uzbekistan, part 2

The letter from academics at London Metropolitan University that I featured yesterday clearly ruffled some feathers at the university. In response, the Vice Chancellor of London Metropolitan University wrote this reply in the UK's Guardian newspaper (thanks to David Wolfson for spotting this): Uzbekistan projects Thursday 16 February 2012 21.00 GMT David Hardman et al …

Continue reading Education and human rights in Uzbekistan, part 2

Education and human rights in Uzbekistan

This is a repost of an article originally published by EurasiaNet.org, available here. British Academics Slam Education Links with Uzbekistan February 16, 2012 - 11:06am Lecturers from the London Metropolitan University have called on their vice chancellor to cease all operations in Uzbekistan following a February 12 editorial in The Guardian criticizing the West for turning a blind eye …

Continue reading Education and human rights in Uzbekistan

Students: heads you lose, tails you lose

Are today's students in the former Soviet Union too political or not political enough? Two recent stories from Uzbekistan and Russia suggest that either way, students will end up being criticised: you're damned if you do care and you're damned if you don't. In Uzbekistan, the government has introduced a new moral code - no …

Continue reading Students: heads you lose, tails you lose

20 years on: human rights in the post-Soviet countries

I'd like to recommend a great article I've just read, The Soviet Fall and the Arab Spring. By an experienced human rights researcher, the article provides six ideas "about what has to happen after the revolution to make change stick". The six ideas are: 1. There is nothing inevitable about transitions to democracy 2. Guard …

Continue reading 20 years on: human rights in the post-Soviet countries

Straws on a camel’s back

The "aeroplane affair" between Russia and Tajikistan, as I suspected, shows no sign of landing (excuse the pun) anytime soon. Konstantin Parshin has - again - written an excellent article summarising what's happened over the last few days, so if you're not following this story elsewhere (and even if you are), do read what he has to …

Continue reading Straws on a camel’s back

Hillary Clinton’s visit to Tajikistan and Uzbekistan

A slightly light-hearted post today as I've spent the last few days unwell and my mind is not in serious analysis mode right now! As anyone in Central Asia will know, the American Secretary of State Hillary Clinton paid a short visit to Tajikistan and Uzbekistan over the weekend. This post is a round-up of …

Continue reading Hillary Clinton’s visit to Tajikistan and Uzbekistan