HERB

New publication: Who are Tajikistan’s international students?

Posted on

HERB_12_cover.jpg.(200x-x123)Who leaves Tajikistan to study abroad, and why?

Where do these students go, and what do they study?

What are their post-study destinations?

These are some of the questions I address in my new essay on Tajikistan’s international students, out today in Higher Education in Russia & Beyond (HERB).

You can find out more about the survey on which this essay is based in earlier blog posts (in five parts): part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4 and part 5.

As I conclude, studying abroad can be a profoundly transformational experience. Many of the people that participated in the research I am reporting on said they had changed greatly as a result of their experiences.

This feeling is neatly encapsulated by the words of one respondent:

“I am so much [a] different person now than I was back then. Education here has broadened my mind to the things that I had no idea of their existence and as I grow in possessing my knowledge I see the opportunities that I can get, and the things that I can do in my life and with my life. I am [a] much happier person now than I was before.”

This issue of HERB looks holistically at international students across the former Soviet space, and I encourage you to take a look at the other essays in this collection.

Higher Education in Russia & Beyond 2(12) – link to whole issue

New article out: The Dominance of Social Sciences in English-Medium Instruction Universities in Central Asia

Posted on Updated on

The latest issue of Higher Education in Russia and Beyond, 3(5) Fall 2015, is just out today and I’m delighted to say it has an essay I wrote in it. The informational newsletter comes from the prestigious Higher School of Economics in Moscow as part of a cooperation agreement with Boston College’s Center of International Higher Education.

The theme for this issue is the disciplinary divide and my short article focusses on the dominance of social sciences in English-medium instruction universities in Central Asia. Using three universities in the region – Westminster International University Tashkent (WIUT) in Uzbekistan, the American University of Central Asia (AUCA) in Kyrgyzstan and KIMEP University in Kazakhstan – I show a strong trend towards offering social sciences subjects and explain why I think that might be the case.

It’s a short article written for non-specialists so please do have a look! This is an area of research that I find very interesting so any feedback or comments you have about the essay and about the field of investigation would be very welcome.

The full issue of HERB can also be downloaded as a pdf here: HERB_05_Emma article on social science in EMI universities_Sep2015.