The next ten years in Central Asian higher education: Looking to the future after a decade of blogging

I've spent many a happy hour enjoying the challenge of finding a vaguely suitable cat meme to go with many of my blog posts Somehow, the tenth anniversary of this blog has rolled around. From my very first post published on 30 September 2011, I've published 345 posts, averaging around three posts a month. In …

Continue reading The next ten years in Central Asian higher education: Looking to the future after a decade of blogging

Conceptualizing major change in higher education

In my research on former Soviet higher education systems, the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 continues to feature prominently as a starting point for some of the subsequent shifts that have occurred in higher education (and in society at large). More recent changes such as the introduction of principles of the European Union's …

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Mapping change in former Soviet higher education systems

I recently presented at the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) Annual Conference and this blog post is about my presentation called Mapping change in former Soviet higher education systems: A view from the Russophone space. I also presented with my colleague Hayfa Jafar on our new joint research on how faculty in post-conflict societies are …

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Skills deficit will bring Tajikistan to its knees; education and training must be prioritised

Avaz Saifiddinov, a journalist with as-independent-as-is-possible-in-Tajikistan Asia-Plus media group, this week reports [ru] – in almost apocalyptic terms – on the devastating impact that a lack of education and skills training can bring to a nation. He calls this qualification deficit the single biggest problem facing Tajikistan today, more so than corruption, lack of electricity …

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