Study abroad survey results: part 2

Following on from part 1, this post covers the pre-departure section of my Tajik study abroad paper. This part looks at WHY respondents wanted to study abroad Pre-departure motivations and perceptions Push-pull factors Respondents were asked to choose one or more reasons (from a pre-determined selection) to explain why they were motivated to study abroad, …

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Well-being in Central Asia conference

Guten tag aus Berlin! I'm here for a conference hosted by the German Institute for Economic Research, joining 14 other researchers who are presenting on various subjects related to well-being in Central Asia. The first day of the conference was hosted yesterday at Humboldt University in central Berlin. As an aside, it’s hugely exciting for a …

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Study abroad survey results: part 1

The long awaited publication on this blog of my recent study abroad survey starts now... Read my earlier post for background to the survey, but briefly: I undertook a survey between December 2011 and February 2012 of just over 100 Tajik nationals who are either studying abroad now, or who have studied abroad in the past. The …

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Former President calls for higher education reform in Kyrgyzstan

Another re-posting, this time from Central Asia Online (http://centralasiaonline.com/en_GB/articles/caii/newsbriefs/2012/05/01/newsbrief-04). If anyone out there knows Kyrgyz and would be prepared to summarise the interview for me, please get in touch! (The Russian version is the same as the English one). Otunbayeva calls for higher education reform Staff Report 2012-05-01 BISHKEK – Former Kyrgyz president Roza Otunbayeva …

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Higher education in Afghanistan

Another foray into the fringes of my blog's remit, but this is the first time I have read anything about contemporary Afghan higher education (anything else to do with education focusses on school level) and I thought it was worth re-posting from the original on Deutsche Welle. My paper on Tajik nationals who have studied …

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Interesting times for Ukrainian higher education

Whilst this blog has a key focus on higher education in Central Asia, it occasionally visits other post-Soviet countries to catch up with developments there. Today we're in Ukraine, at the western edge of the former Union. Whilst Central Asian countries and Ukraine share a Soviet heritage, there are also some notable differences. For example, …

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My first journal article has been published!

I'm delighted to let you know that my first article has just been published online! Entitled Understanding universities' responsibilities to their wider communities, the article investigates what responsibilities universities have to the communities around them beyond their immediate constituents of students and staff. Using a framework developed by the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement to highlight some …

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Postscript to What’s your brand?

Just a few days after my post about universities' brands, I enjoyed reading an article in the Times Higher Education, the UK's specialist higher education publication, about Nazarbayev University. The article "No shame in the name" explains how a Cambridge University college has (at least temporarily) withdrawn a fellowship named after Nazarbayev. As in Nazarbayev …

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Post-soviet universities need academic salaries reform to succeed – University World News

Re-post of an interesting article from: http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=201204070940315 By Gregory Androushchak and Maria Yudkevich For decades, universities in Soviet countries were governed, evaluated and financed according to the same principles. The system is not like this any more. However, faculty contracts – a core element in any university – have not changed much. Faculty contracts in post-Soviet …

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